We are richer because of gratitude.

Gratitude is an offering precious in the sight of God, and it is one that the poorest of us can make and be not poorer but richer for having made it. ~ A.W. Tozer

 

sound iconCARING FOR OUR MENTAL HEALTH

 

Many of us are, frankly, obsessed with the health of our bodies—except when it comes to our brains. Most people don’t think much about the most complex organs in our bodies until we are forced to consider our mental health because something has gone wrong. And some of the things that can go wrong with our brains are outside our control—we can’t always do anything to prevent genetically inherited conditions, the consequences of trauma, or other forms of injury and disease.

 

At the same time, our mental health is not entirely outside our control. In fact, even when a genetic predisposition is present, or our circumstances are harmful, our lifestyle choices can prevent a disorder from developing, lessen its severity, or help us achieve better recovery. Regardless of our predispositions, experiences, or sense of health, it really doesn’t make sense for anyone to neglect the opportunity to protect and strengthen our mental health.

 

No matter who you are, why not give some thought and care to your mental health this year? Here are 11 ways we can all do that.

 

 1. LAUGH

Laughter really is among the best forms of medicine. Studies have shown that laughter can improve our health in multiple ways, including lightening our mood, relieving tension, and improving our cognitive function. It can also change our outlook on life, make us more creative and resourceful, and make us more open to friendly relationships with other people. I hope you have someone in your life who can make you laugh. But you can always work on making yourself laugh, too, and you might entertain someone else in the process. And if all else fails, try YouTube.

 

 2. WALK

Exercise in general is good for our mental health, and walking is great. And for reasons scientists don’t completely understand, walking in nature specifically is especially good for our brains. Try going for a walk each day, either as part of your exercise routine or for a quick head-clearing stroll. Get outside for it if you can. And by the way, some studies have shown just being in nature, walking or not, is very good for our brains. So get out there!

 

 3. BE GRATEFUL 

Gratitude is good for our mental health. It changes the way our brains function. It brings discipline to our thoughts, and it redirects our attention to thought patterns that are good for us rather than destructive. It reduces depression, envy, frustration, regret, and other negative emotions that work against us. It can literally change our minds. So count your blessings. If you make the effort, you’ll never run out of things to be grateful for.

 

 4. PRAY 

For people who believe in God and the power of prayer, it can’t seem particularly surprising that studies would show prayer is good for us. When we connect with God, turn our attention to his love for us, express trust in him, renew our perspective, and receive God’s comfort, of course we’re going to experience a kind of nurture and help we can’t receive anywhere else. Prayer in community, and on behalf of others, can also strengthen the sense of support and connection in our relationships with other people—which are also good for us. But in case you had any doubts, research does indeed show that prayer can reduce depression, stress, and anxiety and is good for our overall health.

 

 5. EAT WELL 

Most of us readily accept the idea that eating well is good for our bodies. But it’s common to overlook the effect our diet can have on our minds. More and more studies are showing links between nutrition and mental health. So eat consistently, eat healthy foods, and pay attention to what seems to feed you well, body and mind.

 

 6. SLEEP WELL 

Sleep and mental health have an intertwined relationship–a problem with one causes problems with the other. Mental health problems can disrupt our sleep patterns, and sleep problems can cause mental health dysfunction. It’s important to consistently go to bed at a healthy hour and get a full, restful sleep (seven to nine hours for most adults). And this can be especially critical for people who have some kind of struggle with their mental health. And if you experience a sleep problem, it’s a good idea to consult your doctor. Sleep disruptions can be indicators of a mental health problem or any of a host of other health issues.

 

 7. DO SOMETHING DIFFICULT 

Hard work (as long as it’s balanced with other health-supporting activities) can be very good for us. And meeting and overcoming challenges is a great way to support our mental health. It helps us develop mental strength and confidence, learn (which is very good for us), and tap into new or dormant internal resources. So consider tackling something that is going to challenge your mind.

 

 8. FACE YOUR FEARS 

When you feel fearful or anxious, your mind and body may tell you the best thing you can do is avoid what scares you. But the truth is, our fears grow larger as we avoid them. And psychologists know the best way to deal with anxiety is to face the things that scare us and push through our reactions to them. Counterintuitive as it may seem, this can be a healing process. If necessary, seek support for this process in the form of someone who specializes in fear, anxiety, and possibly exposure therapy.

 

 9. GO TO CHURCH

Research has shown that people who regularly attend religious services experience fewer problems with depression and other psychiatric problems. This makes sense when you think about it: nurturing our spiritual nature lifts the other elements of who we are, just as caring for our physical or emotional health has an impact on every other aspect of our well-being. Attending services keeps us in contact, and perhaps in nurturing relationship, with a community of people. It fosters a sense of meaning in our lives. And it reminds us that we have hope in God when we are feeling hopeless. Oh, and one more thing: the more often people attend religious services, the lower their risk for substance abuse, which is highly correlated with mental health problems. Which brings me to the following point…

 

10. STAY CLEAN AND SOBER 

Many people with mental health problems also have problems with substance abuse. In fact, substance abuse and addiction is itself a category of mental disorder. For people needing emotional or mental relief, drugs and alcohol can seem like a good idea. They might seem helpful. But they always make things worse. And substance abuse can actually cause mental health problems in some cases, particularly in people who use drugs in their youth. If you struggle with a mental health problem or you’re experiencing emotional difficulties, resist the temptation to turn to drugs or alcohol for help or escape. I promise you will only dig yourself in deeper if you go down that road. And if you already have this pattern in your life, please recognize that your mental health is unlikely to improve unless you also receive help for substance abuse. Seek help from a “dual diagnosis” program that treats both.

 

11. DO SOMETHING CONSTRUCTIVE 

Start or restart a hobby. Do something creative. Get involved in a service project. Read. Learn about a new topic. Help someone else with a project. Help a kid with homework. Studies have shown such activities can be great for our overall health and can have specific benefits for our mental health.

 

Making choices like these won’t guarantee you never experience a mental disorder or emotional struggle. And they probably won’t be enough to “cure” a challenge you’re already living with. But in either case, they will help. So as you’re thinking about your health, give some thought to that powerful organ that sits above your shoulders. Consider the all-important function of your mind. And do something good for yourself.


First published January, 2018 at AmySimpson.com. *Used with permission.


sound icon#AudioBlog💿

11 Ways We Can All Nurture Our Mental Health

by Amy Simpson | Read by Jan VanKooten

More posts by Amy

What Kind of Emotional Contagion Are You Spreading?

y Summer Camp and the UnexpectedWhen I was about 8 years old, I went to summer camp for the first time. I wanted to bring a friend, so I invited a girl from school, and she came with me. I thought it would be great to have a buddy around, and I just knew we would have a great time enjoying this...

READ MORE

The choices we make have a powerful impact on the people around us

Your Pain Comes with Possibilities

yIt Seemed Like A Good Idea It seemed like a good idea at the time. They would borrow the camping gear collecting dust in the garage, and they would head to the mountains to enjoy a night under the stars. Two college buddies enjoying the great outdoors.   Trevor, the young man who would...

READ MORE

Your Pain Comes With Possibilites
Amy Simpson

Amy Simpson

Award-Winning Author

Amy is the award-winning author of Anxious: Choosing Faith in a World of Worry, Blessed Are the Unsatisfied: Finding Spiritual Freedom in an Imperfect World, and Troubled Minds: Mental Illness and the Church’s Mission. She’s also an editor for Moody Publishing, a leadership coach, and a frequent speaker. You can find her at AmySimpson.com and on Twitter.

NEXT STEPS

Anxious: Choosing Faith in a World of Worry

Amy Simpson

Our culture is frantic with worry. We stress over circumstances we can’t control, we talk about what’s keeping us up at night and we wring our hands over the fate of disadvantaged people all over the world, almost as if to show we care and that we have big things to care about. Worry is part of our culture, an expectation of responsible people.

LEARN MORE.

Bread for the Journey

Bread for the Journey: A Daybook Of Wisdom And Faith

Henri Nouwen

A daybook of reflections as Nouwen suddenly found himself on "a true spiritual adventure." For in these 366 original, interlocking morsels of daily wisdom, he provides both sustenance and a trail for us to follow, as he unveils, to his own surprise, his personal map of faith. 

LEARN MORE.

Together in Prayer: Coming to God in Community

Together in Prayer: Coming to God in Community

Andrew R. Wheeler

Prayer is intimidating--what do you say to the God of the universe? How do you listen to Someone you can't see? Add other voices to the mix and prayer becomes downright scary--one more opportunity to feel like an idiot in front of your small group, or one more opportunity to highlight the differences between you. And yet prayer is a gift from God to all of us, and group prayer binds us to one another in ways that no other activity can.

LEARN MORE.

Mental Illness

Mental Illness

Too often, stigma, isolation, loneliness and shame follow a diagnosis of mental illness. Not here. Here we offer resources for mental health steeped in love and grounded in faith. Here you are among friends, welcome just as you are. Here we offer resources steeped in love and grounded in faith. Here you are among friends, welcome just as you are.

LEARN MORE.

Creative Ways to Connect

Creative Ways to Connect in Community

Notecards, Postcards & More

Letter-writing is a vital and life-giving ministry not only to those who are hurting, grieving, recovering, homebound, lonely, ill, depressed, or isolated, but to the writer as well.

Encourage and inspire others by putting #PenToPaper with one (or more!) of our creative notecard or postcard collections. How about tucking one of our professionally printed guides in the envelope?

Support the mission and ministry of Chronic Joy with every purchase from the Chronic Joy Store.

We pray, we serve, we create, we give, and God ignites change one precious life at a time.

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This

Share with your friends!